cabbage-vendor:

youraverageinsanity:

petboyfriend:

me avoiding all my responsibilities

did she just kick a laser beam in half

Feminism

cabbage-vendor:

youraverageinsanity:

petboyfriend:

me avoiding all my responsibilities

did she just kick a laser beam in half

Feminism

(via fuckyeahwomenprotesting)

thebigbadafro:

nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!

I hope that’s his wife putting pads together in the back. His swag is on 5hunna just because he’s part of the gotdamn solution!

(via bohemianarthouse)

txchnologist:

The Chance To Dance Again

by Michael Keller

We highlighted the TED talk of Hugh Herr a couple of weeks ago. But his work is too important and beautiful to leave to just one post.

The MIT associate professor of media arts and sciences is making prosthetic limbs and exoskeletons that restore function in those who have lost legs from injury or disease. This set of gifs focuses on his team’s BiOM powered ankle and foot prosthesis

"Bionics is not only about making people stronger and faster," he said during the talk. "Our expression, our humanity can be embedded into electromechanics."

To prove his point, Herr and fellow researchers studied dance movement to replace the lower leg that professional dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost after last year’s Boston marathon bombing. He concluded his talk by bringing Haslet-Davis on the stage to perform a bionic rumba. 

Read More

(via proofmathisbeautiful)

theskepticdervish:

Life philosophy: If you’re going to fail an exam, might as well do it looking good.

Second life philosophy: There’s a difference between feeling like shit and looking like shit. If you can manage the latter, the former almost doesn’t matter as much. 

this will be my life tomorrow 

projectqueer:

A petition is nearing its target 2,500 signatures challenging Google’s decision to block ‘bisexual’ from its predictive search. When users type words like ‘gay’ or ‘lesbian’ into the Google search page, it suggests what they might be looking for – gay dating, gay pride, gay marriage, gay support… but for ‘bisexual’, it offers no suggestions until you hit ‘enter’.

This is a function Google implemented to prevent what might be offensive searches appearing dynamically while users are typing another word. Not only is this suggesting that bisexuality is offensive in a way homosexuality or heterosexuality are not, the first page of suggestions for ‘bisexual’ simply aren’t that rude – they’re things like advice page Bisexual Index and web hub Bi.Org! Google said it would remove bisexual from the list of blocked terms over a year ago but has still not done so.

(via bohemianarthouse)

nerdfighterfc:

hermionejg:

capitolprostitute:

nationalbuttlickersassociation:

hachestark:

samuel-vimes:

honestlyiamironman:

didn’t the goblet of fire cover this

because how else would Ireland win but krum catch the snitch

actually in prisoner of Azkaban, didn’t Gryffindor need a certain amount of points to proceed to the finals, and that’s why Oliver Wood told Harry to wait until they had scored a certain amount of points before he caught the snitch?

Catching the snitch ends the game and is worth the most points, but it doesn’t guarantee a win. Just like tumblr user samuel-vimes said, Krum caught the snitch at the World Cup Finals, but Ireland still won in the end because they still had more points.

Also the way the ranking system works in the international quidditch league, and I assume at Hogwarts, according to JK Rowlings new reveal, is that teams are awarded a certain amount of points based on the amount of points a team wins by and thats how they are ranked against each other. Rowling said that a win by 150 points = 5 points, 100 points = 3 points, 50 points = 1 point, and a winner of a tie is whoever caught the snitch the quickest. So theoretically a team that only catches the snitch but wins by a margin of less than 50 points is awarded no points and might as well of not caught thats why Wood told Harry to wait until they were up a certain number of points in order to increase their overall ranking and win the cup.

Basically the Premier League.

Is that also how it works in club competition? I don’t remember how it works for domestic leagues (and/or the quidditch equivalent of the Champions League, if any). Admittedly, it’s been a while since I read the books.

(via kaci3po)

edwardspoonhands:

djkenna444:

castayel:

busket:

thetuffthorston:

that-lex-kid:

deadjosey:

ive-been-triggered-by-kankri:

redbloodedamerica:

This is ingenious.

mcdonalds needs to do this

WHAT

okay but I’m actually really scared that the lid of the drink is going to come off or something

//the way this works is that it stops about 2 inches above the top (the hole only big enough to go that far without ripping) so you  wouldn’t have to worry about the lid coming off!
it’s really a brilliant idea. it cuts down on the amount of materials used,  and space it takes up. all around good engineering.

from the looks of it it might be recycled materials too? if not then it should be.

it frees up your other hand from having to carry your drink but also doesn’t shove the cold drink next to the warm food
brilliant!

This is the definition of innovation, no amount of sleeves on a blanket can beat this.

You can even stick it in your cup holder and then snag fries through the vent in the side while you’re driving! OH GOD I’M SO HUNGRY NOW!
Oh No! Critical flaw! Once I am consuming salty hot delicious fries…there is no way to DRINK A DRINK! NOOOO!! NOOOOOOOO!!!!!

edwardspoonhands:

djkenna444:

castayel:

busket:

thetuffthorston:

that-lex-kid:

deadjosey:

ive-been-triggered-by-kankri:

redbloodedamerica:

This is ingenious.

mcdonalds needs to do this

WHAT

okay but I’m actually really scared that the lid of the drink is going to come off or something

//the way this works is that it stops about 2 inches above the top (the hole only big enough to go that far without ripping) so you  wouldn’t have to worry about the lid coming off!

it’s really a brilliant idea. it cuts down on the amount of materials used,  and space it takes up. all around good engineering.

from the looks of it it might be recycled materials too? if not then it should be.

it frees up your other hand from having to carry your drink but also doesn’t shove the cold drink next to the warm food

brilliant!

This is the definition of innovation, no amount of sleeves on a blanket can beat this.

You can even stick it in your cup holder and then snag fries through the vent in the side while you’re driving! OH GOD I’M SO HUNGRY NOW!

Oh No! Critical flaw! Once I am consuming salty hot delicious fries…there is no way to DRINK A DRINK! NOOOO!! NOOOOOOOO!!!!!

snk-potato-girl:

jake—from—statefarm:

This is a seal with hiccups.  
You’re welcome.